energy saving

New Energy Storage Facility to Provide Backup Power for Light Rail Line in Toronto

Ontario is partnering with Toronto Hydro and Renewable Energy Systems Canada Inc. to design and build a battery energy storage facility for the Eglinton Crosstown light rail transit line in Toronto.
New Energy Storage Facility to Provide Backup Power for Light Rail Line in Toronto
Artist's rendering of Light Rail Transit car (

The facility will be located at the site of the future Mount Dennis Station and LRT maintenance and storage facility, currently under construction. It will store energy generated at night during off-peak hours and supply energy the following day to reduce peak energy use and lower the Crosstown's overall emissions and operating costs. The facility will also provide emergency power to the Crosstown in the event of a power interruption, creating a better experience for transit riders.

Energy-Storage News reported the energy storage system will be 10MW / 30MWh, using lithium-ion batteries.

The 19-kilometre Eglinton Crosstown LRT will include 25 stations and stops that will link to 54 bus routes, three subway stations, three GO Transit lines and the UP Express. The line is expected to be completed by 2021, connecting Mount Dennis in the west with Kennedy Station in the east, with a 10-kilometre underground portion between Keele Street and Laird Drive.

The Crosstown is a significant investment in support of Metrolinx's Regional Transportation Plan for the Greater Toronto and Hamilton area. It is is hoped that the project will help manage congestion, connect people to jobs and improve the area’s  economy.

The Crosstown will provide public and environmental benefits, including:

  • increased reliability and comfort for passengers riding on the city's transit system;
  • a reduced number of buses and vehicles travelling along Eglinton Avenue, helping to manage congestion, greenhouse gases and fuel consumption;
  • green features, including a pilot project for a green LRT track that will blend seamlessly into the surroundings; landscaping elements along the corridor; and stations/stops that harness natural light for optimal visibility and safety; and
  • stations/stops that incorporate provincial Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act standards and principles of Universal Design to maximize accessibility for users with a disabilities.
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